next meeting

Peter Lin
"Brassavola Species and Their Hybrids"
Monday, April 13, 2020
7:30PM
NOTICE: THIS MEETING IN THE CHURCH HALL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO CORONAVIRUS CONCERNS. INSTEAD, THE PRESENTATION WILL BE ON THE INTERNET. OSSC MEMBERS WILL BE SENT A LINK WHERE THEY CAN HEAR AND VIEW THE PRESENTATION AS WE GET CLOSER TO THE DATE OF THE PRESENTATION.


about our speaker

Photo of Peter LinPeter Lin started growing orchids over 35 years ago, but then stopped due to school and starting a career. It wasn't until about 15 years ago that the orchid "bug" came back and he is now heavily involved once again! He is an accredited judge with the American Orchid Society, and a hybridizer of mini-catts. He enjoys meeting with other orchid enthusiasts and can often be found at various orchid shows and societies around the country.

Due to limited growing space, Peter specializes in miniature orchids, both species and hybrids, and has received numerous AOS awards. His interests in orchids include dendrobiums, angraecoids, and neofinetias. Peter is also known as "Mr Sophronitis" as he has a passion for growing and collecting them. He maintains a collection of a thousand or more orchids at his home in Southern California in 3 small greenhouses, outdoors, as well as an offsite greenhouse.

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news in brief

  • RE-BLOOMING PHALS  [Submitted by OSSC Member David Lafond on April 17, 2018]

    I have most of my orchids on my outdoor patio, which receives about two hours of direct sun mid-day. Not ideal at all! Not all orchids can handle two hours of direct sun around noon, so my Phalaenopsis are grown indoors by the window in less than ideal lighting. Sometimes we make due with our situations and hope the plants adapt.

    I assumed my Phals would bloom indoors, but last year they did not. Phals need cooler temperatures below 77 F to stimulate bloom. The temperature inside my apartment is less than 77 F so I assumed they would bloom indoors if I kept the heat turned off at night during October. They still didn’t send up any flower spikes. Carol Beule told me she keeps her Phals outdoors until Thanksgiving, and the cooler temperatures stimulate blooms. The only way I could keep my Phals outdoors is to carry them outside and night, then take then inside, protected from harsh sun during the day. The “hobby” was turning into a lot of work, so I didn’t do it, assuming the Phals would bloom during winter indoors where my apartment was below 77 F. Around March, my Phals still did not initiate bloom spikes indoors. I was seriously thinking of discarding them if they weren’t going to bloom indoors, so in a last ditch attempt, I decided to take them outside every night, then take them back indoors every day. So far 3 of the 7 plants have bloom spikes started…..a little late is better than never! I suggest you consult the article “Growing the Best Phals – Part 3” which gives details about temperature requirements to re-bloom Phalaenopsis.

    I need to go put my Phals back outside!

Prior articles found in this section are archived here.

other orchid news

(Most recent articles listed first.)

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